Faces Of Death Pics

Faces Of Death Pics

Faces Of Death Pics

Faces Of Death Pics

If death has a face, many would claim it is that of the Grim Reaper. The image of tall, ominous figure carrying a large scythe, donning a long black robe which contrasts with the ghastly skeleton face has long brought fear to those seeing this apparition as an agent of death. The fixation of death needing an identity dates back to ancient mythology. Most cultures have some type of creature associated with death, many of which have similar appearances. The most popular depiction of the Reaper is that of the entity sent to harvest souls, thus the harvesting scythe.

In Greek mythology Charon represented what most today would call the Grim Reaper. Charon was the ferryman who was said to take the souls of the dead across the river Styx, the river separating the world of the living from the world of the dead. It was thought souls must have payment for the ride or suffer 100 years of wandering the banks of the river.

Faces Of Death Pics

Faces Of Death Pics

Faces Of Death Pics

The Bretons named the angel of death Ankou. Descriptions of Ankou are the most accurate of what many view today as the Grim Reaper. Ankou was said to be a skeleton clad in a black cowl carrying a scythe. Ankou was believed to ride atop a cart used to collect souls that was pulled by horses.

In Norse mythology, Odin is thought to be representative of the angel of death. Odin was considered to be a psychopomp. A psychopomp is a creature, spirit, or deity responsible for escorting newly deceased souls to the afterlife. Odin was regarded as the leader of souls. Odin’s lore was further fueled by the belief his assistants, Valkyries, were responsible for scouring the battlefields for soldiers who died in battle. The Valkyries would choose the brave souls and carry them to the afterlife.

Faces Of Death Pics

Faces Of Death Pics

Faces Of Death Pics

In German lore, the Reaper was borne from stories of men, possibly demons, dressed in black carrying large scythes using those tools to spread disease through the fields. Shortly after their visit people became sick and died. Many Europeans attributed the black plague with the work of the Reaper.

Every culture has some representation of death. With all the differences in religion and beliefs it is very interesting that all representations seem to be similar. The Reaper represents man’s attempt to personify the inevitable mortality everyone faces. No matter the name, the dark cloaked skeletal figure carrying a scythe will continue to elicit fear from the mortal.

By Mat S
Article Source: ezinearticles.com